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The Skinny on Meth Addiction: A Brain Function Beat Down

Meth is one of the most highly-addictive drugs in the world. Unfortunately, it’s also one of the most dangerous. Meth addiction continues to plague the country. They are even often glamorized thanks to shows like Breaking Bad.

But, there’s nothing glamorous about the effects of crystal meth or what it can do to your mind, body, and life.

Getting high on meth impacts your body physically, but it also impacts the brain and neurological system. Meth addiction is actually categorized as a disease of the brain.

The earlier you can recognize the signs of addiction, the sooner you can seek out treatment and help for yourself or someone you love.

The Innocent Beginnings of Meth

Meth was originally developed in the early 1900s as a way to help people who struggled with breathing issues. Healthcare professionals still use it today for cases of ADHD, and even narcolepsy. But, its reputation has far surpassed its medical uses. Today, it is commonly referred to as a street drug.

What does meth actually do when you take it? It helps to boost your energy and can make you feel like you need to be more active and talkative. It gives off euphoric properties, especially when users inject it. Meth releases dopamine into the brain, which contributes to the high, euphoric feelings.

Unfortunately, that high doesn’t last long. That’s why it becomes so easy for an addiction to form. The user keeps wanting (and eventually needing) more for the high to linger.

What Are the Signs of Addiction?

Any type of stimulant addiction is dangerous. But when it comes to meth, the effects are downright scary. Some of the most common signs of an addiction include insomnia, poor hygiene, and even psychotic behavior.

Long-term use can make the effects of the drug worse. People who have dealt with addiction for a long time can develop severe psychotic problems, including delusions and paranoia that can last for several hours at a time.

An overdose of meth can create chest pains, difficulty breathing, and can even render someone unconscious and unresponsive.

How to Treat a Meth Addiction

The earlier you treat meth addiction, the better. The longer it goes untreated, the higher the risk becomes for severe psychological and physical issues.

Unfortunately, early withdrawal symptoms often make it difficult for people to stay in treatment. Withdrawal can put users in a severe state of depression. However, the process does get better for people who genuinely want to kick the habit and stop using.

There is no magic pill or drug that can fight back against meth addiction. Therapy is typically the best way to help someone quit the drug and take control of their lives once again. Many times, therapy will start at a medical or addiction treatment facility, especially if the addiction has been going on for a long time.

If you recognize the signs of addiction early enough, though, seeking help from a therapist on your own terms can help you to break the chains before you get in too deeply.

Typically, meth addicts need additional services after therapy. These help to keep users from relapsing. Most meth addicts have specific triggers, and having a support system in place during the recovery period will make it easier to manage triggers or avoid them entirely.

If you or someone you know is struggling with methamphetamine addiction, it’s never too late to seek out treatment. The lasting effects of meth addiction can be severe and life-threatening.

Don’t go one more day without making sure you, or someone you care about, gets the necessary treatment. Feel free to contact me for more information, or visit my stimulant addiction page to learn more.