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Cancer & Medical Cancer Resilience Life Transitions Organ Transplant Pre & Post Surgical Trauma and Post Traumatic Stress Uncategorized

Effects of Medical Trauma

Medical trauma is a term used to describe the psychological impact of a traumatic medical event or experience. This can include a range of experiences, such as a serious illness, a medical procedure, or a hospitalization. While medical trauma can have physical effects on the body, it can also have significant mental health effects that can last long after the event has passed

.One of the most common mental health effects of medical trauma is post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD is a condition that can develop after a person experiences or witnesses a traumatic event. Symptoms of PTSD can include flashbacks, nightmares, avoidance of reminders of the event, and hyperarousal. Medical trauma can be particularly likely to lead to PTSD because it often involves a sense of loss of control and a threat to one’s physical well-being.

In addition to PTSD, medical trauma can also lead to depression and anxiety. These conditions can develop as a result of the stress and uncertainty associated with a medical event, as well as the physical symptoms and limitations that may result from the event. Depression and anxiety can have a significant impact on a person’s quality of life and can make it difficult to cope with the aftermath of a medical trauma.

Another mental health effect of medical trauma is the development of somatic symptoms. Somatic symptoms are physical symptoms that have no clear medical cause. They can include things like pain, fatigue, and gastrointestinal problems. Somatic symptoms can develop as a result of the stress and anxiety associated with a medical trauma, and can be difficult to treat because they are not caused by a clear medical condition.

Finally, medical trauma can also lead to a loss of trust in the medical system. This can occur if a person feels that they were not adequately informed about their medical condition or treatment options, or if they feel that they were not treated with respect and dignity during their medical experience. A loss of trust in the medical system can make it difficult for a person to seek medical care in the future, which can have negative consequences for their physical and mental health.

In conclusion, medical trauma can have significant mental health effects that can last long after the event has passed. These effects can include PTSD, depression, anxiety, somatic symptoms, and a loss of trust in the medical system. It is important for healthcare providers to be aware of the potential for medical trauma and to provide appropriate support and resources to patients who have experienced a traumatic medical event.

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Anxiety & Stress Life Transitions Organ Transplant Pre & Post Surgical Uncategorized

The Mental Challenges of Liver Transplant

Life can be unpredictable, throwing us into uncharted waters when we least expect it. For individuals facing the daunting prospect of a liver transplant, the physical challenges are often only the tip of the iceberg. The mental and emotional hurdles that transplant recipients and their families must navigate can be equally demanding. In this blog post, we’ll explore the profound mental challenges that accompany liver transplantation and shed light on the experiences of both patients and their loved ones.

The Waiting Game: Anxiety and Uncertainty

One of the most mentally taxing aspects of liver transplantation is the waiting period. Patients often spend months, and sometimes even years, on the transplant waiting list. During this time, they grapple with a roller coaster of emotions, ranging from hope to despair. The uncertainty of when, or if, a suitable donor will become available can be mentally exhausting. Patients may feel trapped in a state of limbo, unable to plan for the future with any degree of certainty.

Fear of the Unknown: Facing Surgery and Recovery

The liver transplant surgery itself is a monumental event, both physically and mentally. Patients must confront their fears and anxieties about the procedure, potential complications, and the unknown road that lies ahead. It’s not uncommon for individuals to experience heightened stress, sleep disturbances, and panic in the days leading up to the surgery.

Moreover, the post-transplant recovery phase poses its own set of mental challenges. Patients may struggle with a mix of emotions, including relief, gratitude, and fear. Adapting to a new lifestyle, strict medication regimens, and the ongoing risk of rejection can be overwhelming.

Guilt and Helplessness: The Emotional Toll on Families

Liver transplant patients are not the only ones affected by the process. Families play a crucial role in providing support, but they too face profound mental challenges. Many family members experience feelings of guilt, helplessness, and anxiety as they watch their loved one endure the physical and emotional rigors of transplantation.

Parents, spouses, and children may grapple with a sense of powerlessness, wishing they could do more to alleviate the suffering of the patient. The uncertainty and roller coaster of emotions can take a toll on family relationships, leading to strained dynamics.

Coping Mechanisms: Seeking Mental Resilience

Amidst these mental challenges, patients and their families often develop remarkable resilience. Support groups, counseling, and therapy are essential resources for individuals navigating the complex emotions surrounding liver transplantation. Sharing experiences with others who understand the journey can provide a sense of community and comfort.

Mindfulness practices, meditation, and stress-reduction techniques can also help individuals cope with the mental strain. Maintaining open communication within the family unit is vital, enabling loved ones to express their feelings and concerns without judgment.

Wrapping Up

Liver transplantation is a life-saving procedure that offers hope to countless individuals battling liver disease. However, the mental challenges faced by transplant patients and their families should not be underestimated. The emotional roller coaster of waiting, surgery, and recovery can leave lasting scars on the psyche.

Support, both from healthcare professionals who understand the unique challenges that come with liver transplantation and within one’s own support network, is paramount in overcoming these challenges. By sharing experiences, seeking counseling, and practicing self-care, individuals can navigate the stormy waters of liver transplantation with greater resilience and hope for a brighter future. Ultimately, the mental strength developed throughout this journey can serve as a testament to the indomitable human spirit.

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Organ Transplant Pre & Post Surgical Uncategorized

Psychological Impact of Organ Transplant

Organ transplant is a life-saving procedure that has become increasingly common in modern medicine. While the physical benefits are clear, the psychological challenges that come with the procedure are often overlooked. Patients often face a range of psychological challenges, including anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

One of the primary psychological challenges of organ transplant is anxiety. Patients who are awaiting a transplant may experience anxiety related to the uncertainty of when a suitable organ will become available. This anxiety can be exacerbated by the fear of rejection or complications after the transplant. Additionally, patients may experience anxiety related to the financial burden of the procedure, as well as the potential loss of employment or social support during the recovery period.

Depression is another common psychological challenge faced by these patients. The physical limitations and lifestyle changes that come with the procedure can lead to feelings of sadness, hopelessness, and isolation. Patients may also experience depression related to the loss of their previous identity and the uncertainty of their future health.

PTSD is a less commonly discussed psychological challenge of organ transplant, but it is still a significant concern for many patients. PTSD can develop in patients who have experienced a traumatic event, such as a near-death experience or a prolonged hospital stay. Patients who undergo organ transplant may experience PTSD related to the physical trauma of the procedure, as well as the emotional trauma of the uncertainty and fear that often accompany the transplant process.

In conclusion, while transplantation is a life-saving procedure that comes with a range of psychological challenges for patients. Anxiety, depression, and PTSD are just a few of the psychological challenges that patients may face before, during, and after the transplant process. It is important for healthcare providers to recognize and address these challenges in order to provide comprehensive care for organ transplant patients. By addressing the psychological challenges of organ transplant, healthcare providers can help patients achieve better outcomes and improve their overall quality of life.

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Addiction Recovery Anxiety & Stress Body & Neuro Brain Cancer & Medical Cancer Resilience Children & Grief Critical Incidents Death in Workplace Executive Social Intelligence First Responders Grief Life Transitions Loss Organ Transplant Pre & Post Surgical Terminal Illness Trauma and Post Traumatic Stress Uncategorized Voir Dire Consultation

Ben Carrettin: Next Level Behavioral Health and Leadership Acumen

In the bustling city of Houston, Texas, one name stands out among the rest in the field of behavioral health and leadership consulting: Ben Carrettin. With over two decades of dedicated service, Ben holds two national board-certifications, is professionally licensed and has several other certifications as well. He is renowned for his expertise in helping individuals navigate the most complex and challenging aspects of life. His diverse range of clinical specialties, leadership experience and cross-cultural training has made him a trusted resource for people; personally, professionally and abroad.

A Journey of Compassion and Dedication

Ben Carrettin‘s journey into the world of behavioral health and leadership consulting began over 20 years ago, and since then, he has made a lasting impact on countless lives. His passion for helping people emerged as he embarked on a mission to provide guidance and support to those facing some of life’s most profound challenges.

Specializing in Healing and Resilience

One of Ben’s primary areas of specialization is working with individuals in recovery from addiction. His empathetic and evidence-based approach has helped many individuals find their path to sobriety, offering them hope and a chance at a brighter future. But Ben’s expertise doesn’t stop there.

He is also well-known for his work with those experiencing complicated grief and loss. Grief is a uniquely complex emotion, and Ben’s compassionate guidance helps people navigate the intricate web of emotions that accompany it. He provides strategies for healing and moving forward while honoring the memory of lost loved ones.

A Beacon of Support for Trauma Survivors

Traumatic events can leave lasting scars on an individual’s emotional life. Ben Carrettin has dedicated a significant portion of his career to working with survivors of traumatic events, offering a lifeline to those who have faced unimaginable challenges. In addition to assisting trauma survivors in his private practice, Ben has responded to many critical incidents in the field as a CISD, assisting survivors, volunteers and first responders. Whether personal or large scale, natural or a man made disaster, Ben’s knowledge, skills and unwavering support empowers survivors to rebuild their lives and find strength within themselves.

A Ray of Hope for Cancer and Organ Transplant Patients

Facing a cancer diagnosis or the prospect of an organ transplant can be an incredibly daunting experience. Ben’s work with cancer and organ transplant patients is a testament to his commitment to helping individuals and their families navigate these challenging journeys. He provides emotional support, coping strategies, and a sense of hope to those grappling with life-altering medical conditions.

Supporting Those Who Serve and Lead

In addition to his work with individuals facing personal challenges, Ben Carrettin also extends his expertise to support those who serve the community. He works closely with police officers, fire and rescue personnel, as well as various clergy and public figures. His leadership consulting services equip these professionals with the tools and strategies needed to navigate high-stress situations and lead with resilience.

International Diversity and Cross Cultural Adjustment

Professionals and their families who move to the US from other countries face a host of challenges and adjustments. The transitions they experience moving from one culture into another are complex and multifaceted. Ben has intensive, cross-cultural training and professional experience assisting individuals and families through these challenges and changes. He also works virtually with US professionals who are working abroad.

Executive Social Intelligence and Public Speaking for Leaders

Executive Social Intelligence coaching, or ESI, helps leaders strategically engage their colleagues and employees and better understand how to maneuver large scale events in the workplace such as downsizing, mergers, international expansion, leadership and structural changes and other organizational development challenges. Through this method, Ben also assists leaders in maximizing their intended message and goal when speaking whether internally or publicly.

Jury and Behavioral Consultant

In more recent years, Ben has been hired on several occasions for more specialized and out-of-the-box projects including assisting legal teams in preparing for and selecting jurors during voir dire and with business leaders seeking to assess the effectiveness and reliability of employee engagement patterns of key managers and directors during top leadership changes.

The Impact of Ben Carrettin

Ben Carrettin’s impact on the Houston community and beyond is immeasurable. His dedication to the well-being of individuals and the growth of leaders has transformed personal lives and professional organizations. His compassionate approach, combined with his extensive experience, has earned him a well-deserved reputation as a leading behavioral health professional and leadership consultant.

As Houston, Texas continues to evolve, Ben Carrettin remains a steadfast pillar of support for those in need. His work embodies the spirit of empathy, resilience, and transformation, leaving an indelible mark on the hearts and minds of all those he touches. Whether you’re on the path to recovery, dealing with loss, facing trauma, or seeking to enhance your leadership skills, Ben Carrettin is a name you can trust to guide you towards a brighter future.

(Originally presented as an introduction for Ben at a privately contracted Critical Incident response service to employees at the local office of a Texas-based company in Spring of 2017).

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Addiction Recovery Life Transitions Loss Organ Transplant Pre & Post Surgical

Quick Look at Kidney Transplants

The Quick Look at Kidney Transplants

The kidneys are a fundamental element of our excretory system. The two bean-shaped kidneys play a very critical role in the human body. They are responsible for filtering out the blood and other body fluids. In this way, they ensure the release of waste that we don’t need and that can actually be harmful to hold on to. But when serious problems arise, a kidney transplant may be needed. And that can be a bit scary and overwhelming. You don’t have to go it alone. Below you will find a quick look at kidney transplants and a few ways we end up getting there.

There are several sorts of kidney problems that can occur. You might experience a kidney stone, swelling or deterioration. All of these kidney problems can halt those “exit” functions. For example, if the kidney becomes unable to filter blood, then the wastes accumulate within different body parts, causing numerous issues like high blood pressure. When approximately 90% of a kidney stops filtering and excreting, it results in kidney failure. 

Kidney transplantation is a life-saving procedure – and more frequent than you might think. It can be a solution for  kidney failure and other conditions requiring the removal of one or both kidneys.

In the initial stages, kidney “wash through” machines and dialysis might work. However, in severe kidney failure, the likely option is a kidney transplant. 

Although a human body can survive on one kidney, more health compromised people need another. And people with other medical ailments or second kidney failure will have to rely on an outsourced kidney; a kidney transplant. 

Causes of Kidney Failure 

Despite occurring naturally as we age, a few other factors can also cause kidney failure. Individuals having diabetes are more prone to kidney problems. Chronic or uncontrolled blood pressure levels also add to kidney damage. (the consistent inflammation can affect the filtering process). Unchecked, these all eventually lead you towards severe kidney failure. Increasing the chance that you will end up needing a kidney transplant.

Dialysis Vs. Kidney Transplant

With failed kidney, there can be two available options. First, you can go for dialysis, which is a machine-assisted excretion treatment and requires regular treatments for a lifetime. Second, you can seek ti have a kidney transplant. 

No doubt, a kidney transplant can seem scarier than dialysis. When is surgery not scarier? But it can be effective in the long term and raise the improvement and quality of life. With dialysis, a person has to continue undergoing the same procedure again and again. There is no point at which you recover -it’s an ongoing treatment process. It is because dialysis is a more of a maintenance procedure rather than a fixed point treatment. 

A kidney transplant, on the other hand, is a distinct and hopefully one-time procedure. Once you have a matched donor, undergone surgery and completed your recovery your health status, ideally, you should be improved. That is why a kidney transplant is often a preferable choice. 

Some people are afraid of surgery or getting rejected during kidney transplants. And let’s be very clear, you need to be willing to care for the new kidney and the recovery has a lot requirements and continued success depends on your ability to make a lot of lifestyle changes and keep them. Many people are ready to promise anything in the face of a serious medical condition – the reality is, with a transplant you are already very lucky to get a new organ to begin with – you need to be serious in your commitment. It’s rare enough to get a great match, you aren’t likely to get another one. 

In the end, it’s up to the patient and their physician to determine what is the best path for them.

Why Choose a Kidney Transplant?

When compared to dialysis, a kidney transplant can be preferable because of the following reasons;

• Low Treatment Cost – It is one-time, whereas dialysis will continue to cost for a lifetime. 

• Better Quality of Life –It gives you the opportunity to live the rest of your life in a better state of health – for many, this means in peace and comfort.

• Fewer Dietary Restrictions –Unlike dialysis patients, there are fewer limitations on what or what not to eat. 

• Lesser Health Risk –Unlike dialysis, it enables you to stay healthy in the long run.

Kidney transplant is not always an option. A few things might restrict you from going for a transplant. It is potentially unsuitable for people with old age, severe heart diseases, cancer, mental illness, alcohol or drug addiction, etc. So, everyone needs to consult with the doctor first, and if it comes under any no-go category, the person will have to continue with dialysis. 

Types of Donors for Kidney Transplant

For a kidney transplant, there can be two types of kidney donors. They are the following; 

1) Living Donor

A human body can rely completely on one healthy kidney for all metabolic activities. That is why a person with two healthy kidneys can donate a kidney to someone else who needs one. However, there are criteria to be met, such as blood group and tissues, to matchto either donate or accept a kidney. 

A kidney donor can be a family member or someone else. It is always preferable to receive a kidney from a blood relation as it lets you avoid the risk of rejection and is usually beneficial. 

2) Deceased Donor

Another way of getting a kidney is from a deceased person. It happens in a way that hospitals usually gather data on people needing a kidney. The hospital is informed immediately whenever a deceased person’s kidney matches the patient. The doctor prepares an instant surgery for a transplant. It is a very time sensitive process because the kidney transplant should take place shortly for a kidney to be valuable. 

Kidney Transplant Procedure 

Kidney transplantation is more or less like other surgical treatments. During a kidney transplant surgery, the doctor injects the anesthetic dose within your blood through an intravenous line in your arm. It is basically to make you fall asleep or for a while to undergo the incision. Once unconscious, the doctor makes an incision to open up your abdominal region. He then puts in the donor’s kidney and connects the arteries and veins to your circulatory system. As the blood starts flowing, the new kidneys function within your body.

Alongside that, your kidneys need a connection to the ureter. It can only then carry on the excretion process smoothly. The doctor connects the newly induced kidney to the ureter and the bladder. 

As far as your original kidneys are concerned, they usually remain inside the body and aren’t disposed of. However, in some cases, when the failed kidney causes trouble, it is removed too. 

Risks of Having a Kidney Transplant

Although a prevailing treatment for severe kidney issues or kidney failure, a kidney transplant is not a full-proof solution. It causes multiple risks either during the transplantation surgery or afterward.

• Rejection of the Donor Organ – While operating, the donated kidney might not be compatible with your body. It is possible to even after undergoing the matching tests and everything else. So, there is definitely risk, even beyond the ones typical of surgery. 

• Kidney Diseases –The transplantation, although it eradicates the ailment, for the time being, there are chances of the patient regaining a mild or severe ailment. 

• Side-effects –Undergoing the surgery can cause you side effects. It will leave an incision mark and temporarily cause redness, swelling, and pain. 

None of the above three risks is unpreventable. Almost every doctor provides medication to minimize donor rejection, kidney diseases and surgical side effects. And there is a lot that you can do to help or hinder your own success.

Postoperative Possible Complications of  Kidney Transplant

• Infection – Minor infections like urinary tract infections, colds, and flu are common after kidney transplants. However, in most severe conditions, pneumonia or CMV (cytomegalovirus) infection may occur.

• Blood clots –  The most common complication after a kidney transplant is the development of blood clots in the arteries connected to the donated kidney. In some cases, medications can be used to dissolve the blood clots.

• Urine leakage –  Sometimes, after a kidney transplant, urine may leak through the connection between the ureter and bladder. This usually happens during the first-month post-kidney transplant.

Conclusion 

Opting for a kidney transplant requires you to think twice before jumping in. It ultimately, is up to you because you must live with both the benefits, risks and lifestyle changes required of the transplant. You must be brave enough to analyze the situation and make a decision. 

Facing this decision and the life changes and commitment it requires can be extremely stressful. And not just on you, but also on your loved ones whose life will also change in the process. You both may feel worried about you undergoing surgery, fear of rejection or other complications. It marks a transition period in your life and theirs – and that is stressful all around. Be gracious and kind to yourself and each other. Stress directly impacts health, so consider working with a professional counselor who is experienced at working with transplant patients and their loved ones.

Do exercise, eat healthy, engage in positive activities, and take good care of yourself before and after the kidney transplant. And obviously, alcohol and other drugs will only damage your chances and your new kidney – you need to leave those behind. Change your lifestyle so you can spend your life in style.

References

1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK567755/

2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK553074/

3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7230851/

4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5549004/

5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6716102/

6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8711553/

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Cancer & Medical Cancer Resilience Life Transitions Pre & Post Surgical Terminal Illness

Chronic Illnesses, Telehealth and the Pandemic

Chronic Illness, Telehealth and the Pandemic

The pandemic has impacted the lives of almost everyone in some way. But healthcare has been incredibly impacted. Specifically, in order to keep people safe from contracting the COVID-19 virus, telehealth has become more prominent than ever. And previously neglected chronic illnesses seemed to catch up with many of us during the pandemic. While it’s not necessarily new, the pandemic boosted the practice of telehealth tremendously across the country. And there are many benefits to it for people who might otherwise have accessibility issues. 

But, if you’re dealing with a chronic illness, telehealth and other changes made in the healthcare industry might not be in your best interest. 

So, how has the pandemic changed treatment for those who are suffering from chronic illnesses? 

Chronic Illness; from Frustration to Telehealth

Whether you’ve been able to hop on to a telehealth session with your doctor or not, the pandemic has caused a lot of frustration in getting deserved treatment. 

First, if you have been able to meet with your doctor(s) in person, you’ve probably experienced extended wait times. Many clinics and practices are short-staffed. Others are trying to space patients out, so time spent in different waiting areas is longer. 

When you have a chronic illness, long wait times can be difficult. You might be in pain or discomfort, and sitting there longer than usual will not help. Extended waits between visits have also become prominent, which can be difficult if you need help and relief immediately. 

At the start of COVID, hospitals were forced to put more resources into treating critical patients with the virus. As a result, patients with chronic illnesses or other cases were seen less frequently. Those depending on consistent treatment suffered, as a result. 

Telehealth and Managing Your Chronic Illness

Because the treatment changes brought on by COVID may not be going back to “normal” just yet, learning how to manage your illness at home is crucial. Obviously, that’s another huge change that can cause additional stress and confusion during times of need. 

For some people, home management techniques simply don’t work. Or, they might for a while, but eventually, medical treatment is necessary. Patients having to wait significantly longer between visits can find themselves on a decline very quickly. 

No matter what symptoms you’re having, one thing you can do to help manage them is to have an open dialogue with your doctor. One benefit of telehealth is that it often makes healthcare providers more accessible. Consistent communication is important. If you explain what you’re dealing with, your provider may be able to call in a new prescription or recommend something else. 

Taking Care of Yourself

The lack of treatment options and availability throughout COVID is, again, extremely frustrating. If you’ve found yourself in a situation where you’re waiting for your doctor to see you (yet again), you’ve probably felt completely overwhelmed. 

One of the best things you can do is to take care of yourself and manage your stress. Don’t let yourself get too frustrated by these treatment changes. Instead, find ways to relax and de-stress every day. Doing so can help to lower your blood pressure and may have a pain-reducing effect on your body. 

Hopefully, now that there is a light at the end of the tunnel with the pandemic, normalcy will return to the healthcare industry. In some cases, however, pandemic practices might be here to stay. You may have to get used to longer wait times between visits, distancing, and the expanded and increasing promotion of telehealth. 

Make sure you’re communicating your issues and concerns with your doctor, no matter what the rest of the pandemic may bring. Doing so may give you peace of mind, and hopefully, some measure of relief. 

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Pre & Post Surgical

Counseling Before and After Surgery

Counseling Before and After Surgery

Surgery has been suggested to you because it is believed to be an appropriate medical choice for dealing with your current condition. Although you may accept that surgery is the best treatment approach, it is very natural to have some thoughts and fears around the “unknown”. It is important that you discuss any questions or concerns with your surgeon and determine whether counseling before and after surgery may be recommended as part of your treatment plan.

You may be relieved to know that there are other things that you can do to prepare for your surgery and also to recover in the best possible way. What your surgeon brings is his/her skill and expertise, which you have confidence in. But what can you bring? You have the ability to bring the most positive emotional attitude and lowest stress possible – to give your body the best environment for surgery and for healing and recovery afterwards.

When we are stressed – our blood pressure goes up, or quality of sleep/rest go down and our brains produce a chemical called cortisol which for short time and infrequent time is pretty normal. But when we stay anxious, afraid or “tense” for longer periods of time or to a larger degree this can spell trouble for our physical health. Any medical professional will tell you that chronic or severe stress complicates recovery and has a directly negative impact on your health. Whether before surgery or in the days and weeks after surgery – high and frequent stress put you at risk.

Only you are in control of your thoughts and in turn the emotions that you will experience and even how your body may respond. The mind and the body are connected in an amazing way and your belief in “yourself” and in the healing process is important for your overall recovery. By taking an active approach to your healing and recovery, you become an important and active team member along with your surgeon and the other health professionals taking care of you.

It can be empowering to know that there are real, tangible ways for you to prepare for surgery and optimize your healing and recovery after return home. Even if you are challenged with an ongoing illness that you must still manage after surgery, there are valuable skills that you can learn that may help you cope better and help you live a full, active and engaged life.

The overall experience and outcome of surgery can be enhanced when you make the choice to take an active role in your healing and recovery. The stress of a diagnosis, an illness or injury, the impending surgery and the recovery process all can have a significant impact on your physical, psychological and social state. From the time a decision is made to have an operation until the recovery is complete, there are major physical and psychological processes that can either enhance or impede healing and recovery.

Your body is an incredible gift and it has within it the wisdom and power to influence your emotional and physical well-being. There is no such thing as failure…health and healing are a lifelong journey. There are times that the goal may not be for a cure or even for complete recovery. Instead, the rewards could come from discovering new aspects of life and your truest, most authentic self, from new lessons learned to the joy of facing difficult challenges, or from the deepening of relationships and the appreciation of the unique preciousness of your own life.

Whether you are dealing with an illness, preparing for surgery or concerned about your recovery, it is my hope that you would know that there is assistance available to guide you along your journey. If you would like to discuss any of the issues addressed above or if counseling before and after surgery may be right for you, please feel free to contact me for a consultation.

Want to learn how you can become an active partner in  your recovery process?

Call Now (346)-493-6181

Our brain was built for learning and survival. We have to teach it to be happy.

Ben Carrettin is a Nationally Board Certified Counselor (NCC), Licensed Professional Counselor-Supervisor (LPC-S) and Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor (LCDC). He is the owner of Practice Improvement Resources, LLC; a private business which offers an array of specialized counseling, evidenced-based clinical consultation, Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) and targeted ESI-based services to individuals and businesses.

Counseling Before and After Surgery